Personal Invite

Nga Pakiaka 2019 Art Exhibition

Tēnā koe e te Rangatira

The Trustees of Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o Te Whenua cordially invite you to the our 2019 annual art exhibition opening.  The theme of this years exhibition is ‘Revisiting Old Voyages’. It commemorates the exploits of our ancestor Kupe and celebrates the 10 year anniversary of the Wairau Bar repatriation.

There will be work on display from Te Tauihu Māori artist’s such as Lewis Smith, Clarry Neame, Paora Mackie and Keelan Walker and will be curated by Dr. Peter Meihana.

The event will be held this Friday evening at the Millennium Public Art Gallery, Cnr of Seymour Street and, Alfred St, Blenheim 7201 beginning at 6pm.

Spaces are limited so please RSVP via the registration form below as soon as possible, or by no later than 14 Nov 2019.

If you have any questions please contact the following details.

Keelan Walker
0210457714
keelan@loudnoise.co.nz

Hikoi through the Wairau Lagoons with Springlands School.

Hikoi through the Wairau Lagoons with Springlands School.

Sharing our kōrero with the community.

This week Ngā Pakiaka o Te Morehu o Te Whenua Trust  in Wairau/Blenheim has guided 150 local primary school students through the Wairau Lagoons to share with them some of the wonderful pūrākau and traditional kōrero of the area.

Their three day lagoon hikoi saw them reach that point and their kaitiaki are now proudly demonstrating these taonga with the wider community. They believe that by doing so, allows everyone to enjoy our connection to the land, promoting its appreciation and protection for future generations.

Organisers Sue Parish, Keelan Walker and Dr Pete Meihana are thrilled with the significant milestone and achievement they have reached after starting their initiative last year.  Their goal has been to grow the traditional knowledge of the Ahi Kaa whānau in the Wairau so that they could operate confidently as kaitiaki of their whenua and their local heritage.

They have been supported by Lewis Smith who assisted with guiding the lagoon hikoi. Lewis and his whānau have been regular attendees and contributors to the wānanga over the last 18 months. He has emerged as a passionate and competent kaitiaki and in the recent hikoi he was their leading guide on the lagoon hikoi.

Check out the images from the day in our gallery.

Related resources and articles.

Te Putahitanga Article

Our facebook page article covering the day’s event

Keelan Walker’s blog post about the day

 

 

Hikoi to Meretoto

Hikoi to Meretoto

Hikoi through Tōtaranui to Meretoto 

Join us on a hikoi through Tōtaranui to Meretoto to visit our mahinga kai and to learn some of the history of the area.

Tēnā koe e te Rangatira

The Trustees of Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o Te Whenua cordially invite you to our next event/wānanga.

We will be travelling through Tōtaranui to Meretoto aboard the Beachcomber on:

Sunday, 17 March 2019
Leaving: Picton Marina 9:00am (meet at 8:30)
Return: 3:00pm

Spaces are limited so please RSVP via the registration form below as soon as possible, or by no later than 13 of March 2019.

If you have any questions please contact the project coordinator via the following details.

Sue Parish
022 158 8705

or email keelan@npmotw.org.nz

Personal invite from the Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o te Whenua Trustees

Personal invite from the Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o te Whenua Trustees

The Foot Steps of Uenuku Book Launch

Tēnā koe e te Rangatira

The Trustees of Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o Te Whenua cordially invite you to the launch of their first publication featuring an iconic Māori traditional story of the Wairau region. The booklet has been produced for circulation to primary schools and whānau across the Marlborough region.

The event will take place at Ukaipo Cultural Centre, Grovetown, commencing at 6 pm on Wednesday the 24th of October 2018.

Spaces are limited so please RSVP via the registration form below as soon as possible, or by no later than 23rd of October 2018.

If you have any questions please contact the project coordinator via the following details.

Keelan Walker
0210457714
keelan@loudnoise.co.nz

Karaka Point

Karaka Point

PA KARAKA

By Richard Bradley

The name karaka is derived from the Karaka tree with its orange fruits that are quite common on the New Zealand coast. There are a number of headlands, rivers and expanses of beach where this tree is found and in most cases, there are signs of the Maori occupation. Sites in Marlborough with the name Karaka can be found in the Marlborough Sounds, Rarangi, Cape Campbell and a small creek on the north bank of the Waiau Toa (Clarence) river.

The headland Pa just north of Waikawa in the Marlborough Sounds is known as Te Rae o Karaka after the Ngati Mamoe and Ngai Tara chief named Te Karaka who established the pa prior to the arrival of Rangitane from the north island. He also lived at Cape Campbell, and the reef adjoining the headland there still carries his name to the present day.

The pa was occupied by a mix of Rangitane and Ngai Tara up until the 1820s when it was overrun by the musket raiders of Ngati Toa and their Taranaki allies. The occupants managed to survive the withering musket volleys of the invaders and escape to their inland pa at Te Urukakea up what is known today as Esson’s valley, and thence over the Tirohanga saddle to Waikutakuta.

The Pa has remained unoccupied since that time.

Te Whanganui

Te Whanganui

Te Whanganui – Port Underwood

By Richard Bradley

Te Whanganui is the original Maori name for what is known today as Port Underwood and lies to the north of the Wairau River mouth. The name simply means great harbour or inlet and most of the bays within Te Whanganui show signs of early Maori occupation consisting of pa, kainga right up into the time of the first whalers and sealers. It is in these bays that the richness of Te Whanganui asa Mahinga Kai can be found.

The names of many important Tupuna are recalled on some of the peaks and in the many bays and coves. Some of these names will be familiar but we probably weren’t aware of their location within Te Whanganui. The most significant landmark being Rahotia at the head of the port is linked to the peak known as Te Piripiri o Te Huataki. From these points the expanse of the lands of Rangitane, Ngati Mamoe and Ngai Tara can be seen. Others of interest are places like Rangitane Bay, Pukatea and Kaikoura Bay.

Another prominent landmark is the Island of Horahora Kakahu in Te Whanganui which was the site of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on June 17 1840. Rangitane Chief Ihaia Kaikoura along with Te Rauparaha and Te Rangihaeata signed for the local natives. While you can’t find Sherwood Forest at Robin Hood Bay, the Waikutakuta river flowing into the bay adjoins the pa and garden site where Ihaia Kaikoura drew a map in the sand for the first surveyors to the district.