Hikoi to Meretoto

Hikoi to Meretoto

Hikoi through Tōtaranui to Meretoto 

Join us on a hikoi through Tōtaranui to Meretoto to visit our mahinga kai and to learn some of the history of the area.

Tēnā koe e te Rangatira

The Trustees of Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o Te Whenua cordially invite you to our next event/wānanga.

We will be travelling through Tōtaranui to Meretoto aboard the Beachcomber on:

Sunday, 17 March 2019
Leaving: Picton Marina 9:00am (meet at 8:30)
Return: 3:00pm

Spaces are limited so please RSVP via the registration form below as soon as possible, or by no later than 13 of March 2019.

If you have any questions please contact the project coordinator via the following details.

Sue Parish
022 158 8705

or email keelan@npmotw.org.nz

Personal invite from the Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o te Whenua Trustees

Personal invite from the Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o te Whenua Trustees

The Foot Steps of Uenuku Book Launch

Tēnā koe e te Rangatira

The Trustees of Ngā Pakiaka Mōrehu o Te Whenua cordially invite you to the launch of their first publication featuring an iconic Māori traditional story of the Wairau region. The booklet has been produced for circulation to primary schools and whānau across the Marlborough region.

The event will take place at Ukaipo Cultural Centre, Grovetown, commencing at 6 pm on Wednesday the 24th of October 2018.

Spaces are limited so please RSVP via the registration form below as soon as possible, or by no later than 23rd of October 2018.

If you have any questions please contact the project coordinator via the following details.

Keelan Walker
0210457714
keelan@loudnoise.co.nz

Karaka Point

Karaka Point

PA KARAKA

By Richard Bradley

The name karaka is derived from the Karaka tree with its orange fruits that are quite common on the New Zealand coast. There are a number of headlands, rivers and expanses of beach where this tree is found and in most cases, there are signs of the Maori occupation. Sites in Marlborough with the name Karaka can be found in the Marlborough Sounds, Rarangi, Cape Campbell and a small creek on the north bank of the Waiau Toa (Clarence) river.

The headland Pa just north of Waikawa in the Marlborough Sounds is known as Te Rae o Karaka after the Ngati Mamoe and Ngai Tara chief named Te Karaka who established the pa prior to the arrival of Rangitane from the north island. He also lived at Cape Campbell, and the reef adjoining the headland there still carries his name to the present day.

The pa was occupied by a mix of Rangitane and Ngai Tara up until the 1820s when it was overrun by the musket raiders of Ngati Toa and their Taranaki allies. The occupants managed to survive the withering musket volleys of the invaders and escape to their inland pa at Te Urukakea up what is known today as Esson’s valley, and thence over the Tirohanga saddle to Waikutakuta.

The Pa has remained unoccupied since that time.

Te Whanganui

Te Whanganui

Te Whanganui – Port Underwood

By Richard Bradley

Te Whanganui is the original Maori name for what is known today as Port Underwood and lies to the north of the Wairau River mouth. The name simply means great harbour or inlet and most of the bays within Te Whanganui show signs of early Maori occupation consisting of pa, kainga right up into the time of the first whalers and sealers. It is in these bays that the richness of Te Whanganui asa Mahinga Kai can be found.

The names of many important Tupuna are recalled on some of the peaks and in the many bays and coves. Some of these names will be familiar but we probably weren’t aware of their location within Te Whanganui. The most significant landmark being Rahotia at the head of the port is linked to the peak known as Te Piripiri o Te Huataki. From these points the expanse of the lands of Rangitane, Ngati Mamoe and Ngai Tara can be seen. Others of interest are places like Rangitane Bay, Pukatea and Kaikoura Bay.

Another prominent landmark is the Island of Horahora Kakahu in Te Whanganui which was the site of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on June 17 1840. Rangitane Chief Ihaia Kaikoura along with Te Rauparaha and Te Rangihaeata signed for the local natives. While you can’t find Sherwood Forest at Robin Hood Bay, the Waikutakuta river flowing into the bay adjoins the pa and garden site where Ihaia Kaikoura drew a map in the sand for the first surveyors to the district.

Rahotia

Rahotia

Rahotia

By Dr. Peter Meihana.

Rahotia is a peak located at the head of WHANGANUI and is west of Rahatia and Onapua and north of Whangakoko. Rahotia has an elevation of 174 metres.

If we look towards Te Whanganui from the Wairau Bar we immediately see Rahotia. There are two
oral traditions that account for the naming of this prominent landmark.

One tradition speaks of the marriage between Te Huataki, of Rangitane, and Wharepuka of Ngati Mamoe and Ngai Tara. Te Huataki was one of a number of chiefs who had migrated from Wairarapa and married tangata whenua as a way of bringing an end to hostilities.

According to tradition Huataki and Te Aomairie, Wharepuka’s father, stood at the summit of Rahotia where Huataki declared, wherever my ‘penis (raho) points will be my descendants’.

Another tradition holds that Tukaue, another migrating chief who had himself married three tangata whenua women (Ruamate, Hinepango, Hinerewha), ascended the maunga whereupon he uttered ‘mai te taumata o Rahotia’.

https://www.topomap.co.nz/NZTopoMap/nz41929/Rahotia/

Wānanga 1: Omaka

Wānanga 1: Omaka

Wānanga 1: Omaka

Kia ora tatou e nga morehu – The first of our wananga for 2018 took place last weekend with an overnight stay (or noho) at Omaka Marae.

Commencing on Friday 12 April at 5.30pm about 35 adults and children attended the wānanga. The historical origins of the term Nga Pakiaka Morehu o Te Whenua as a term describing Ahi Kaa were discussed. The importance of the role of Ahi Kaa in modern-day Maori social structures was also discussed particularly entitlements and responsibilities.

Insights were given into the design of and decoration of Omaka Marae as a storehouse of the tribal customs and traditions that relate to the wider rohe.

We are now in the process of organising the next event which we hope to release the details of later this week.